Tag Archives: disability benefits

The Daily Digest, 3/28/11

While objective evidence may benefit litigants who previously would have failed on their claims, the availability of objective evidence gives a “double-edge” to the “double-edge” of behavioral science evidence [as Ken Murray of the Arizona Fed. Public Defender’s Office said … Continue reading

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The Daily Digest, 3/24/11

Some litigants have successfully used their brain dysfunction to obtain tolling of a missed filing deadline. While equitable tolling most often arises in habeas proceedings, the same principle, that under extraordinary circumstances a filing deadline may be tolled, applies in … Continue reading

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The Daily Digest – 3/10/11

Does age of onset in legal contexts mean chronological or developmental age? This is a live issue in the death penalty context because in Atkins v. Virginia, the United States Supreme Court found it cruel and unusual punishment under the … Continue reading

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The Daily Digest, 2/14/11

Memory detection is one of the cutting-edge areas of cognitive neuroscience research. So much so that at Stanford Law School, in conjunction with the Stanford Interdisciplinary Group on Neuroscience and Society (SIGNS) and with support from Stanford Law School, NeuroVentures, … Continue reading

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The Daily Digest, 2/8/11

Brain Dysfunction and Disability Benefits Strommer v. N.Y. State & Local Police And Fire Ret. Sys., 2011 WL 240153 (N.Y. App. 2011) A popular area for introducing cognitive neuroscience is to substantiate “invisible injuries” and claims in disability cases. In … Continue reading

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